Youngest Teddington brawl accused gives evidence in court

Richmond and Twickenham Times: Deceased: Patrick Lawless died from injuries sustained on the night of the brawl Deceased: Patrick Lawless died from injuries sustained on the night of the brawl

A man being tried for his alleged part in a fight that ended in the death of a student told a court he did not realise he had a glass in his hand during the brawl.

Max Mears, 19, of Temple Sheen Road, East Sheen, is the youngest of seven men facing trial at Kingston Crown Court after the fight, which started in Teddington High Street on November 10, 2012.

He is charged with one count of violent disorder.

Mr Mears told the court he noticed people leaving the Royal Oak pub so joined them out of curiosity and, because he did not expect any violence, kept his pint of beer in his hand.

He said he heard shouting, went down an alleyway and then returned to the high street where he saw someone run past.

He said: “The next thing I knew he’s on the floor. I saw a movement underneath people’s legs and I heard the noise.”

Mr Mears told the court he saw Patrick Conway being punched by two or three people so went to help him.

He said: “That’s when I make the decision to throw a punch. I could see Pat Conway couldn’t defend himself. I could see him getting backed up against a wall and I could see him getting hit repeatedly in the face.”

Representing Mr Mears, Dean George, asked him if he had a glass in his hand and he told the court he did but did not realise at the time.

He said: “The glass was in my hand. I was not trying to use the glass.”

Mr Mears told the court his punch did not connect and after he saw Mr Conway’s attacker fall over he withdrew.

The court heard Mr Mears again became concerned for Mr Conway, who he saw him being attacked again along with his friend Callum Hurley.

He said: “That's when I quickly reacted and threw punches. After I threw my two punches I stepped back.”

Mr Mears told the court he still had the glass in his hand but again had not intended to use it.

He said the glass was not broken and he put it down on the pavement about 10 seconds after throwing punches.

The jury saw a photo of Mr Mears taken after the incident that showed a cut on his forehead, which is now scarred.

When Mr George asked why the photo was taken he said: “My girlfriend found it hilarious that I had this cut on my face.

“She said I looked like Harry Potter.”

During cross examination prosecutor Bobbie Cheema suggested Mr Mears pretended he did not realise the glass was in his hand.

She said: “You knew you had a glass and you simply didn’t care that you were going to hit people with a glass.

“You used the glass quite deliberately didn’t you?

“You were enjoying yourself that night. You weren’t at any point defending yourself or anyone else. You were joining in the fight with pleasure.”

Mr Mears agreed with Ms Cheema’s suggestion that he had time to drop the glass before throwing a punch.

Ms Cheema said: “The impression you were intending to give was that you were there, ready to get involved if necessary.

“You weren’t afraid. You were aggressive, intimidating and ready to join in.”

Ms Cheema suggested Mr Mears left the scene to avoid the police.

She said: “You had been hitting people with a glass hadn’t you? You got yourself involved in that fighting and if the police had turned up you would have been arrested wouldn’t you?”

The trial continues.

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